Mathematics

Solving the problem.

Most schools start with rules and computations that almost never relate to daily life. At Pomfret, we start with real-world problems, and then learn the math so we can solve them. The Mathematics Department offers everything from an introductory Integrated Mathematics sequence to advanced calculus and statistics. In addition, our diverse curriculum includes courses in economics, engineering, and financial literacy.

Integrated Mathematics II

The Integrated Mathematics Sequence provides an alternative to Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II. The courses spiral concepts from algebra and geometry while continuing the development of fundamental skills. Integrated Mathematics II focuses on quadratic functions, probability, advanced geometry, and introductory trigonometry. This integrated program incorporates content not only from algebra but also from numbers and operations, geometry, proportional reasoning, data interpretation, and probability and statistics. The emphasis is on developing and strengthening algebraic thinking, conceptual understanding, and basic skills. The course stresses symbolic, graphing, and tabular representations of information and data. Integrated Mathematics II is the second of three courses in our Integrated Sequence.

Honors Geometry

Topics covered in this course are similar to those that are found in a regular section of Geometry, but the pace and academic rigor allows for the greater breadth and depth analysis of material. This course is for students possessing a strong understanding of Algebra I concepts, high mathematical aptitude, and good reasoning skills. Prerequisite: High achievement in Integrated Mathematics I.

Honors Algebra II

Topics covered in this course are similar to those found in the regular section of Algebra II, but the pace and academic rigor allows for the greater breadth and depth analysis of material. Additional topics include exponential and logarithmic functions, right angle triangle trigonometry, circular functions, sequence and series, and might include elementary probability and statistics. Prerequisites: High achievement in both Integrated Mathematics I and II.

Calculus I

This is an introductory course to First Year College Calculus. Topics covered: review of functions, limits, continuity, rates of change of function and the derivative, and integration. Prerequisite: Pre-calculus or its equivalent with approval by the Mathematics Department.

Advanced Statistics

This course is equivalent to an introductory, non-calculus based college course in statistics. Since statistics is a key element of many courses of study in college, any student interested in psychology, sociology, humanities, business, economics, biology/life sciences, medicine, mathematics/statistics, engineering, etc. would benefit from this course. The purpose of the advanced placement course in statistics is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: exploratory analysis, planning a study, probability, and statistical inference. Students must have their own graphing calculator, which has a full menu of statistical functions. Science, engineering, business, and mathematics majors usually take an upper division calculus based course in statistics, for which the Advanced Statistics course will be an effective preparation. Prerequisites: Integrated Mathematics III, strong mathematical background, and permission from the instructor.

Macroeconomics

In this course, students will begin exploring how a nation’s income is measured, carefully analyze Gross Domestic Product and debate whether it’s an outdated measurement for growth. Next, a look into costs of living will segway into inflation and its relationship with unemployment. Understanding measurements for savings and investment will guide students into a look at the basic tools of finance. Open-economy concepts of trade balance, exchange rate, and aggregate supply/demand will broaden the lens of the class and initiate a look into developing nations and their economies. Lastly, students will play a stock game that will allow them to buy and short sell stocks on an on-line platform, tracking their portfolio over the course of the term. Short writing assignments, quizzes, and tests will be the primary forms of assessment in this class.

This courses is open to juniors and seniors or by departmental approval.

Financial Literacy

The Financial Literacy course is designed to inform and educate students in concepts of personal finance and money management. Students will begin to develop the skills and strategies that promote responsible personal financial planning. Topics include financial psychology; loans and credit; budgeting; savings and investing in the capital markets. This course is open to seniors or by department approval.

Brian Rice

Brian Rice

Mathematics Department Head
Edward Browne Jr.

Edward Browne Jr.

Mathematics Teacher
Ellen Browne

Ellen Browne

Mathematics Teacher
Matthew Goethals

Matthew Goethals

Mathematics Teacher
Andrew Graham

Andrew Graham

Mathematics Teacher, Form Dean
Martha Horst

Martha Horst

Mathematics Teacher
Olinda LaBeef

Olinda LaBeef

Mathematics Teacher
RJ Labeef

RJ Labeef

Math and Chemistry Teacher
Samantha Slotnick

Samantha Slotnick

Mathematics Teacher
Caroline Wardlow

Caroline Wardlow

Mathematics Teacher